Skip to main content

Cantharone Wart Treatment

Cantharone is a wart treatment that we are currently using at Community Foot Care to treat plantar warts.
Warts are skin growths caused by viruses. Warts can grow on any part of the body and their appearance depends primarily on their location.
Foot Warts are usually on the soles of the feet and are called plantar warts. Most plantar warts do not stick out above the surface like common warts because the pressure of walking flattens them and pushes them back into the skin. Plantar warts usually appear as thick spot of skin.
The normal actions of these medications is to form a blister underneath the wart. This occurs within 24 hours of application. The blister formation kills the wart by cutting off its blood supply. Occasionally, there may be some blood in the blister fluid, this should not be alarming. The blister may also itch.
Once this Cantharone treatment is applied you should expect:
After 4 hours: mild discomfort may occur. Blister should occur after 24 hours.
After 4 days: Crusted blisters should fall off leaving a spot that may be tender and itchy. Medication may be needed to control itching.
After 7 days: May experience loss of pigment, but all symptoms should be gone.
Contact your Podiatrist if you have any questions about Cantharone Wart Treatment, or any other foot care needs.

Comments

UMG said…
Great post. Find all information about foot care, foot surgery in NY, ankle surgery, foot specialist, foot doctor, cosmetic foot surgery, diabetic foot pain, podiatrist directory and health treatments.
chiris cole said…
Continue the good work; keep posting more n more n more.
hand warts

Popular posts from this blog

Turf Toe: A Tough Injury to Overcome

With the fall weather comes football season – and unfortunately, with football season comes injury. Whether you find yourself at your local football field to cheer on your own football star, cheering on your high school team from the stands, watching the Buckeyes take the field on Saturdays or the Bengals or Browns on Sundays, chances are you’ll hear the expression “turf toe” at one time or another this season. The expression turf toe might lead one to believe that the injury is a minor ailment limited only to those wearing football helmets and jerseys; however, this is not the case. Turf toe often plagues dancers as well, and can actually impact anyone in the right circumstances as it is an injury to the soft tissue around the big toe joint that occurs when the toe is extended beyond its normal range of motion.
Turf toe isn’t a simple injury that pulls a player out of a game or a dancer out of a single performance. It can leave athletes sidelined for weeks in extreme pain.
The good new…

Tips on Orthotics

If you have orthotics or are considering purchasing them, you may want to consider the following tips to ensure that you are getting the most for your money and doing the best thing for your feet. First, keep in mind that orthotics are not just for wearing with one particular type of shoe – they can be worn with athletic shoes, dress shoes, work boots, snow shoes – pretty much all types of shoes that have a back to them and provide some support at the base of the shoe.
When going shoe shopping, be sure to bring your orthotics with you and wear them when trying on new shoes. You want to be sure that the shoe will work with the orthotic while providing comfort and the right kind of support for your foot. Likewise, you want to be sure that the orthotic will work with the shoe you have in mind.
Also, you will want to have the same shoes or stockings that you plan to wear with the shoes you purchase so that you can see how they work with your orthotics and your shoes. Make sure they are com…

Feeling the Pinch this Autumn? Bunions May Be to Blame

With the curtain closed on summer and sandal season, fall is the season during which Community Foot Specialists sees an upswing in patients whose feet are feeling the pinch in their closed-toe footwear. This seasonal phenomenon seems to focus on women, although there are men who have this issue. The common culprit? Painful bunions that were given room to breathe during sandal season, but now face close quarters of a fall boot or shoe.
Bunions are abnormalities that form on the joint at the base of the big toe in the form of a bony bump. They occur when the big toe pushes against the other toes, which force the big toe joint in the opposite direction. As time passes, the abnormal positioning of the toe enlarges the joint. This further crowds the toes of the foot and causes pain and discomfort.
Bunions can occur for a variety of reasons. One of the most common causes is tight shoes, although they can also come about as a result of an inherited structural or mechanical defect, a stress to…